Tuesday, 31 March 2009

Two Sentence Tuesday: 31 March 2009

To prepare for the historical posts I write I read from a variety of sources. Two recently read sentences from “True Canadian Stories of the Great Lakes” by Mark Bourrie are: “There were still enough lifeboats left on the Mary Ward to take all the passengers off, and the waves were so small that they didn’t scare the passengers. The warm late-fall weather, which has caused so much false confidence in so many doomed sailors, lulled the Mary Ward’s passengers and crew back into their bunks.”

From my current dark fantasy WIP, Keeper 2, two sentences I wrote: “Stefan started up the narrow path, Maggie behind him, scrambling over the loose scree at the bottom. About a third of the way up it stopped in a badly eroded area, one side sheet rock, the other dropping off into space.”


For other participants to Two Sentence Tuesday visit Women of Mystery.

14 comments:

David Cranmer said...

All your nature posts have paid off. "Loose scree" and the entire two sentences have me there in the moment.

Crystal Phares said...

Two more great lines! Thanks for sharing, Barbara.

Clare2e said...

Barbara- You keep taunting us with descriptions from your fantasy MS. At some point, you simply must give us sentences with:

"...and the secret turned out to be.."

"...she suddenly realized the most important thing was..."

"...their eyes met, and then their..."

You are too cruel!

Barbara Martin said...

David, it's those years I spent tramping around Banff National Park coming out.

Crystal, glad I could whet your appetite.

Clare, this is the second novel manuscript, though it does carry part of the premise of the first. Sorry, not revealing the secret. That's the best part. The physical liaison is too x-rated for here. The most important thing is...you have to read the book when it's out.

Clare2e said...

X-rated, huh? Well, since you've teased me so without really telling me anything, you wicked creature, I'll have to read it for sure!

Gary Rith Pottery Blog said...

eeeek, and then....

Reader Wil said...

Thank you so much for your visit. Interesting post, Barbara.

Linda McLaughlin said...

Both selections are intriguing. I sense a coming tragedy for the passengers and crew of the Mary Ward. Hope your characters fare better, but I'm left waiting with baited breath to find out what happens next. From the bits and pieces you've posted, it sounds like a fabulous novel!

Barbara Martin said...

Clare, I take your comments as a compliment and they are cute. I've sent you an email and you can respond in the comments.

Gary, I'm not too keen on drop-off paths either.

Wil, thanks. A writer's lot is never easy.

Raph G. Neckmann said...

Your sentences about the loose scree and drop off give me vertigo!

Barbara Martin said...

Linda, the Mary Ward was a shipping fatality that occurred in 1872 near Collingwood, Ontario.

Next week I will post the subsequent two sentences following these two while I work on this second WIP. This section is full of suspense, action and conflict of an internal nature.

Charles Gramlich said...

Even your sentences evoke a sense of wild nature.

Cloudia said...

Another worthy post, Barbara. Aloha-

Barbara Martin said...

Raph and Charles, then it has the effect I intended.

Cloudia, thank you.