Tuesday, 5 August 2008

Tuesdays for Travis - Amethyst Lake (Jasper National Park, Alberta)

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Season: late June to mid-September (cannot go earlier due to caribou calving and it is known to be a grizzly route). It is necessary to check with Parks Canada whether the area is open or closed due to bears.

The only two ways into Amethyst Lake is by riding horses or hiking in 14 miles. The trail head is at the end of the Mount Edith Cavell road, about 25 km south of Jasper. Jasper can be reached on highway #16, 360 km west of Edmonton, Alberta. If you hike in you use your own camping gear and come in a group of 6 or more (if less, you might be bear dinner); if you take an outfitter package there are more creature comforts like heated chalets, hot showers in the main cabin and home cooked meals: at an approximate cost of $150 per day.

The four mile long Amethyst Lake, located in the Tonquin Valley, offers splendid fishing for rainbow and brook trout as large as 12 pounds. Recommended fishing tackle includes a light spin casting rod with 4-10 pound test line, with lures such as flatfish, Len Thompson spoons and willow leaves. Fly fishermen should bring an assortment of dry and wet flies. A permit is required for use of the backcountry in Jasper National Park and a fishing license.

The picturesque trail route to the Amethyst Lake will be posted at a later date as I wanted to get the fishing aspect in for Travis Erwin today. You can find the link to his blog on the sidebar to the right.

Photo Credit: [1]-brilang-CC=nc-sa-flickr.

20 comments:

laughingwolf said...

of the two main parks there, jasper is my kind...

Barbara Martin said...

Tony, I like both Jasper and Banff National Parks, although I have had more visits in Banff, Yoho and the Kootenay Parks.

Charles Gramlich said...

I love the name of the lake. Amethyst.

gary rith said...

I wonder what the early summer mosquito situation is like?

Barbara Martin said...

Charles, the lake probably gets its name from the reflection of the Ramparts behind. I have seen pictures where the water has beautiful purple and turquoise colours.

Gary, it is recommended for hikers to wear a long sleeves, pants and a hat with mosquito netting. There is a boggy area nearby which apparently has scads of mosquitos.

laughingwolf said...

i like em too... but jasper was my first, so has the bigger tug for me....

L.A. Mitchell said...

Apart from the prospect of being eaten alive by bears and mosquitos, I can't imagine anything more beautiful than a purple lake reflection.

BernardL said...

A Grizzly route... I remember the idiot who went to play with the grizzlies and took his girlfriend along on his documentary. Real life horror.

Travis Erwin said...

I never caught a brook trout larger than ten inches so I can't imagine hooking one that large.

gary rith said...

That is so cruel. Such a long cold winter, then the weather gets nice and ZAP! We are all just food for the mosquitos. Gorgeous place, though.
BTW, Barbara, there is a pic of a glazed cow plaque going into the kiln at potsblog today. We have to hope for a good firing, righto?

Barbara Martin said...

L.A., if one ventured in during late August or in early September both menaces would limited in number. Mosquitos don't do well in cooler weather, and the bears would be getting sleepy (and they'd be nice and fat from eating berries and marmots).

Bernard, grizzlies are quick to temper followed by anger, although they are known to be gentle animals. Sometimes people who go into the wilderness suprise a bear in the bushes and then things go wrong very quickly for both parties. It's not unlike coming up behind someone and shouting "boo!" Which is why hikers are encouraged to whistle and sing while they are moving: to give bears time to move away from that area. Most bears avoid humans because they have a natural fear.

Travis, there's your trip of a lifetime. Take the outfitters trip, go fishing and eat hearty, and breathe in all that refreshing mountain air.

Gary, long, cold winters are a part of living in Canada. There are more mosquitoes in Tonquin Valley because of a large boggy area near the lake. But up there in the summer time the sunsets are around 10:30 p.m. and sunrises as early as 4:00 a.m. There is a lot of sunshine and daylight to do whatever needs doing. Wearing DEET helps, and no citronella sprays: because grizzlies (I've heard) will rub up against people wearing it. It's like a dog rolling in awful stinky stuff in the grass.

Michele (Rocky Mtn.Girl) said...

I am aware of this beautiful lake and have not had the chance of fly fishing this area yet. I put a big emphasis on the yet! I was asked by some friends one summer but had to turn them down because of my job but will take up the offer one year! Your information is awesome...

It's nice to meet you Barbara and a pleasure to have looked over your blog archives. Beautifully comprised blog of photography and information! Thank you for linking me, I really wish to do the same!
Mountain Retreat

Pam said...

Barbara this is fascinating to me about grizzlies,something quite foreign here. Thank you for commenting on my blog. I cannot begin to imagine how cold Canada can get.

Barbara Martin said...

Michele, welcome and we have common affinity for the mountains in B.C. and Alberta.

Pam, it is important to clothe oneself in layers of wool, cotton or polyester during frigid weather to prevent frostbite or hypothermia. Having a hot drink before going outside helps keep the inner body warm.

Eleanor said...

What a beautiful mountain! Will have to make a plan to get to Alberta! And I shall definitely skip the grizzly season. I was interested in the naming of Mount Edith Cavell road - I have always loved the account of Edith Cavell's heroism in WWI.
Pleased you enjoyed my photos of Paris. Do visit again when you are back from your hiking trip. I now have posted the second half of my adventure - to Tuscany. Warm wishes Eleanor at Thatchwick

redlan said...

whatta lovely background. nice wiews.

Barbara Martin said...

Eleanor, welcome, browse and enjoy.

Barbara Martin said...

Redlan, welcome, enjoy your stay and browse. I agree with your comments on friendships through blogging.

Maria said...

Barbara, thank you again for this wonderful trip - the mountains look thrilling!

Barbara Martin said...

Maria, welcome and come again. When I have walked in the mountains in the national parks the scenery is always spectacular.