Monday, 29 August 2011

Recovering Trumpeteres


[1]

These pretty birds are making a wonderful comeback from near extinction. Lake Ontario is not their normal habitat which is the west coast of British Columbia and parts of Alaska and the interior of British Columbia and Idaho.

Every spring and summer when I venture down to Lake Ontario there they are in pairs or singles, some with cygnets paddling in tow. Large at 60 inches, their wingspan is 96 inches. For awhile there were only a few pairs; and now there are multiple groups of them along Lake Ontario wherever people venture to offer food. They'll take wild birdseed as fast as the ducks and Canada Geese do.




[2]

Photo Credits: [1] Grant Gingko CC=nd-sa-flickr, [2] steveharris CC=nc-flickr.

Research: A Field Guide to the Birds of North America by Michael Vanner, Parragon 2006 p.49.

13 comments:

Leah J. Utas said...

Glad to see it.

Michael Offutt said...

Swans are really pretty.

Teresa said...

Thanks for sharing such beautiful photos, Barbara!

Charles Gramlich said...

It's always wonderful to hear about a species making a comeback. Well, except for bed bugs! :)

Reb said...

Alberta is also home to the Trumpeter Swan. It is the city bird of Grande Prairie and I grew up watching them on the reservoir across from our house. They are a magnificent bird and I am glad they are making a comeback and that some have chosen ON to make home.

Viola said...

They are wonderful birds! And so are your pictures! :)

Barbara Martin said...

Leah, any improvement to an endangered species assists in the survival of humans. We need to care more about other species and their habitats. Your own photos reflect that.

Michael, they certainly catch the eye with their graceful movements.

Teresa, they are incredible birds.

Barbara Martin said...

Charles, every speices has a purpose. As for bedbugs I'm not too partial on, but there must be some insect carnivore that could be used to lower their impact on peoples' sleeping arrangements.

Reb, I stand corrected. The map in the book wasn't clear on area. I noticed this morning there is an area marked in the Dakotas south of Saskatchewan. As for these swans making their home here in Ontario, I believe they were introducted by wildlife specialists.

Barbara Martin said...

Viola, it's fun to watch them feed below the water surface, actually tipping their back end up to bob in the water while they feed off the waterplants on the bottom.

Marian Perera said...

Hi Barbara, I was just wondering why the swan in the first picture doesn't have an orange bill like the ones in the second.

Regardless, I enjoyed the pictures and some day I should go down to Lake Ontario to see the swans for myself. Guessing it's too late this year.

Barbara Martin said...

Marian, I can't tell you why the colour in the beaks are different. As for going to see the swans, they're here until the end of September, even early October. I've seen them as early as mid-March down at Mimico.

laughingwolf said...

good to see they're making a comeback!

we must STOP encroaching on habitats of ALL wild critters... green spaces MUST be increased in sizes/numbers

Barrie said...

These swans are magnificient. I'd love to see them around Lake Ont.!