Monday, 25 April 2011

My Town Monday - Going In Style



Raincoat for Ladies. This coat is made of rubberized Covert Cloth;…double stiched seams velvet collar, half belt; colors, grey and fawn. Sizes 32 to 42 5.00

As most of my past posts for My Town Monday have been in various historical periods of Canada, today I am covering the fashions and furniture of 1906 from the Browns’ Limited Spring Catalogue, Portage La Prairie, Manitoba. Unfortunately I do not have the men’s portion of the catalogue, however, I’m certain the ladies section will suffice. This portion of catalogue is from my Grandmother Edith who immigrated to Canada in 1906, picking this up in Winnpeg en route to Alberta. I scanned what pages remain in the hopes of salvaging the contents before it disintegrates. Thus, here are some excepts accompanied by illustrations.



Ladies – “How to Dress Well

“This is a matter of considerable importance to women. If you want to be well dressed you must select those garments which combine all that is new and up-to-date in Style, Fit and Workmanship; you want all this in a moderate cost. In this catalogue you will find a number of Northway Garments that are designed to meet this demand.

“They are always in the forefront with the new styles for each season. They are honestly made, shape-keeping garments. The fit is everthing that can be desired. The value you can judge from the garment here displayed. The materials are always the best quality possible, consistent with the price of each garment…”




















Ladies and Misses’ Jackets and Cravenette Coats

An example of a listing: “618. LADIES’ CRAVENTTE RAINCOAT. 45 inches long, fly front, two clusters of pleats on each side, tacked down in centre, surmounted by strappings of self, collarless style, pleated back, pleats surmounted by self-strappings. Made in Fawns and Greys, and also similar styles in Fawn Covert Cloths. 15.00, 17.50 and 20.00


Ladies’ Wrappers, made of strong print, 8-in flounce on skirt, tight-fitting back, with fullness from waist line; frill around yoke; large sleeves made to button at cuff; colors, navy and white, black and white, red and white. Sizes 32 to 44 1.50















Child’s Dress






















Ladies' High Grade Style Skirts






















These wool skirts come with pleats, some trimmed with tabs and buttons; in various colours of black, fawn, tweeds. Prices: 5.50, 7.75, 8.50


And those fashionable undergarments ladies wore: the underskirts made in black staeen with various rows of gathered flounce trimmed in ruffles.






















Luckily togay women don't have to wear those form fitting, cinched up corsets made with whale bone staves.

Part Two next week. Click to enlarge any of the photos.


For other participants in My Town Monday please go here.

17 comments:

David Cranmer said...

I will bookmark your marvelous post, Barbara. My characters from the old west are moving into this time period and this is helpful research info.

debra said...

So good to see you back! The raincoat would be useful here these days.

Leah J. Utas said...

Absolutely fascinating. Thank you.

Reb said...

You always find such interesting stuff to post about. Very glad we don't have to wear the corsets, but very cool designs.

Teresa said...

This is such a cool post, Barbara! I am so glad you shared your Grandmother Edith's catalog with us as you were salvaging it. It was very interesting.

Barrie said...

Barbara, this is fascinating!

Barbara Martin said...

David, I wondered whether I should include the whitewear (undergarments which consisted of corset cover and bloomers). I recall going into Eaton's as a child where a section of the ladies wear was named 'whitewear'. A woman of loose virtue would not wear a corset. A chaste modest lady would always wear a dress or coat that buttoned up to the neck to avoid ruining her reputation.

Barbara Martin said...

Debra, it's good to be back. I agree with you on the raincoat. It would be a great style to bring back, especially in a wool blend to ward off those chilly winds of spring.

Barbara Martin said...

Leah, sometimes bits of history can remind us that things aren't really so different now.

Barbara Martin said...

Reb, when I was very young the early days of Alberta didn't interest me much. But now, to look at a portion of an old catalogue printed in 1906 one year after Alberta became a province brings nostalgia alive.

Barbara Martin said...

Teresa, I'm certain you will like some future posts from Grandmother Edit's diary of when she immigrated. Hopefully I can find accompanying photos to set the scene of the times.

Barbara Martin said...

Barrie, perhaps food for thought for one of your upcoming mysteries. Some great grandmother has left a secret to be discovered later.

Charles Gramlich said...

Fashion for women has been big for a long time it seems. I wonder when it really started.

RuneE said...

This was style indeed, but I have a feeling that it was not for everyone. However, I agree with you - life must be much easier for the women of today.

Barbara Martin said...

Charles, I think it began when women decided they needed to catch the eye of a man.

Barbara Martin said...

RuneE, to think: no washer scrub boards and tubs to do laundry in, no cooking and baking on cast iron stoves that needed wood fires -- although my mother managed when she was growing up. She said you learned what worked.

Reader Wil said...

How wonderful to see those clothes from the past. Actually I prefer the underwear as normal clothes!
Thanks for your visit. I don't know what they sell in the shop on the photo, but in the Dutch Oxfamshops they sell, coffee, tea, chutney, jam, rice other food and all kind of articles for the house.