Tuesday, 14 April 2009

Two Sentence Tuesday: 14 April 2009

This week I am back to reading fiction: historical crime suspense. A book I am finding difficult to put down, the prose is so well written that it carries you forward. Two recently read sentences are from The Anatomy of Deception by Lawrence Goldstone, a book I will be doing the next review on:

“At Christmas 1887, fifteen months before this story began, the world was introduced to a fictional character destined for such immeasurable acclaim that he would overwhelm his creator’s efforts to be done with him. The essence of this character’s appeal was not derring-do, as in the dime novels of Beadle & Adams, but rather in his uncanny ability to unravel a set of data that had stumped lesser men and proceed to a logical and incisive conclusion.”

As a continuation from last week’s two sentences from my draft dark fantasy WIP, Keeper 2, where a group of travelers are carefully making their way along an old trail on an outcropping of rock. Here are the following three sentences:

“She kept her eyes on Stefan’s shoulder to avoid looking down; and her foot slipped again, this time over the edge. Although she knew better than to look down on a long climb, Maggie glanced to see empty space beneath her. She gasped, feeling a surge of vertigo.”


For other participants please visit Women of Mystery.

19 comments:

David Cranmer said...

"...She gasped, feeling a surge of vertigo." I like it.

And I checked the link you provided and read the bit on Lawrence Goldstone. Sounds good.

Terrie Farley Moran said...

Barbara,

I am looking forward to your review of the Anatomy of Deception.

Your sentences were, shall I say it? very edgy!

Terrie

Sekhar said...

Should check that book now. Thanks for letting me know :)

Crystal Phares said...

Great post Barbara! I can't wait to find out what is going to happen.

Charles Gramlich said...

whoop, heights are one of those things that can get me when described in fiction. This scene put me right there on the narrow trail with them, even though it's only two sentences.

Leah J. Utas said...

I'm feeling the vertigo, too. Well done.

Reb said...

Oh, I just got vertigo too! Good lines!

Raph G. Neckmann said...

I've got vertigo thinking about it!

More gripping sentences, Barbara!

Reader Wil said...

Barbara! I think, that in this book the climb is so well described, that I feel my fear of heights coming up! Interesting post!

Linda McLaughlin said...

The sentences by Goldstone are interesting. Is that a reference to his protagonist or to Sherlock Holmes?

I'd be gasping, too, if I were in Maggie's position, perched on the edge of a cliff. Good job.

Steve Malley said...

Looks like you certainly know how to keep the tension up!

Barbara Martin said...

David, the book by Goldstone is excellent.

Then the next two sentences should be right up your alley.

Terrie, the review may be ready by Saturday.

Sekhar, so far it's a great read with interesting bits of history revealed for the era.

Barbara Martin said...

Crystal, then return next week for another two sentences.

Charles, I'm not good with heights, especially sheer drops with nothing much to hang onto.

Leah, thanks.

Barbara Martin said...

Reb, I'm amazed that almost everyone who comments is affected by the sentences.

Raph, I wouldn't think giraffes were afraid of heights.

Wil, I'm pleased that the limited space on the trail is coming across in my writing.

Barbara Martin said...

Linda, it is Sherlock Holmes, though the physicians in the story are investigating symptoms of why certain people died.

Poor Maggie, the height is much higher than she thought.

Steve, thanks...posting these sentences is a good test of the work.

Raph G. Neckmann said...

Barbara, I get dizzy looking at my shoes sometimes!

Leigh Russell said...

Sounds gripping, Barbara

Rick said...

Just stopping by to say hi and to catch up on what you've been up to. I did a cross country this year, and there are parts of the Rockies where that scene could have been described from a car! You know, those places where you're afraid to look out the window because you'll see nothing but empty space?

Donnetta Lee said...

Oh, vertigo. Just the word makes me nervous. I've had it a couple of times and it's no fun. Enjoyed the post. D